Sharon Historical Society

Sharon, Massachusetts

Where the past is always present!

Preserving the heritage of Sharon for 42 years!

Admission is FREE!

 

About Sharon Historical Society & the “Yellow Schoolhouse” Museum

Our Mission: The Sharon Historical Society was founded to promote the research, study, dissemination, publication and recording of the history of the Town of Sharon, Massachusetts.

 

Street Address: 16 High Street, Sharon, MA 02067-0175, just up the street from the historic Sharon Public Library, in Post Office Square

 

Open Hours: Out of concern for the health of our membership and collections, the Sharon Historical Society has temporarily suspended regularly scheduled open hours, to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

The Yellow Schoolhouse Museum is accessible to those who are physically challenged. Parking is available behind the museum or at the adjacent Municipal Parking Lot.

 

  • As our bylaws require, a meeting seeking the participation of the fullest quorum of membership available, to offer an opportunity for member participation in the Society’s direction, is held once per Quarter. These meetings may be the opportunity for elections to the board of directors. See more information on elections in our bylaws and policies.
  • The SHS Board of Directors typically meet the 4th Thursday of the month at 7:30PM, unless otherwise stated here, on Facebook, or in the Quarterly Heritage Hunter newsletter.

Historical Views Around Sharon Center

Pettees Store c1920

Pettee's Store, PO Square circa 1920

SMainSt c1905

South Main Street circa 1905

Town Hall c1905

Town Hall circa 1905

Pettees Store c1920

Pettee's Store, PO Square circa 1920

SMainSt c1905

South Main Street circa 1905

Town Hall c1905

Town Hall circa 1905

Updates

September 19th, 2020

A Letter from Shirley Schofield

Dear Members of the Sharon Historical Society:

Last December, an annual election was held. That election violated the Society’s established procedural protocols and immediately sparked a crisis of leadership on the Board of Directors.

At the March 2020 Quarterly Meeting, the membership voted overwhelmingly to invalidate that flawed election process and to restore the Board as previously constituted. The re-instated Board worked diligently to appoint members to vacant Board seats, revise the Society’s bylaws, plan for a new election and work to secure and administer the Society during an unprecedented internal crisis, as well as a worldwide pandemic.

A few members continued to oppose the work of the Board and, instead, actively sought to thwart the direction of the membership. These efforts to intimidate and bully on the part of a few rogue members cannot and should not be allowed to overwhelm the continued efforts of the Society and its Board to advance the mission that has been our foundation since 1982.

I encourage you to visit our website at www.SharonHistoricalSociety.org to read the official minutes of the meetings referenced here and decide for yourself.

The Society recently mailed the August 2020 Heritage Hunter newsletter and ballot which outlines the current situation and the path forward. Please refer to your copy of the Heritage Hunter for instructions on how to virtually attend critically important, upcoming meetings on October 8 and the Annual Meeting on November 12, and how to submit your ballot. We hope you will make your voice heard and we appreciate your continued support of the Sharon Historical Society Inc., as we plan for a stronger, brighter future.

Very respectfully submitted,

Shirley Schofield
Past President

A Letter from Shirley Schofield

August 21st, 2020

Dear Members of the Sharon Historical Society:
We are all negotiating challenging times. On top of the usual life challenges, we are doing our best to protect each other from the risks of the latest virus. We hope that you are staying safe. Even though the museum is closed, you can be sure that we are taking steps to maintain the facility and protect our precious artifacts. You are encouraged to visit our website www.sharonhistoricalsociety.org for important updates.
As members of the Sharon Historical Society, we are also working our way through internal challenges and your support is needed more than ever. We are looking forward to getting the pandemic under control and returning FUN to our society. We hope that you join with us during the upcoming virtual membership meeting and fully participate in the upcoming election. You will be able to join by your computer or by your cell phone.
We want to remember all of our members and friends who have moved onto the great historical society in the sky. We are dedicating this year’s annual election in the memory of our long-time, dedicated member and my fellow SHS Class of ’46 classmate and friend, Bob Parrish. 
Sincerely, 
Shirley Schofield
Past President

Many of our members rely on this timeline of compiled historical events in Sharon’s history, brought to you by our Past-President, Fmr. Chief Archivist, & Beloved Sharonite, Shirley Harris Schofield.

 

A booklet collection of Sharon memories, by current and fmr. residents of Sharon, including many unique images and post cards, from Sharon’s past!

 

100th Anniversary Edition of “Sharon the Beautiful”

Sharon Historical Society Exclusive

Sharon The Beautiful

Originally printed in 1912 by the Sharon Improvement Association
with text written by J. Eveleth Griffith

Cost: $19.00, plus shipping

Postcard History of Norfolk County Massachusetts

Paul Tedesco, co-author and publisher

PostcardHistory

A table top book – hardcover with 416 pages
and over 400 illustrations, many in color.

The book, a collaboration by members of each community,
presents the history of Norfolk County and its 28 towns/city
through vintage postcards and much more information.

Cost: $39.95, plus shipping

Sharon-A Destiny Predicted, A Path Followed.

Author Mel Leventhal, long-time Sharon resident

Most of the chapters are related to various subjects about Sharon, its origin, growth, temperance, medicine, schools, religion, industry, zoning, history of ice cream, women in the military and more. Other chapters , including the answer to “Who Was Kilroy?” are the results of a wandering mind!
Mel states “Sharon is a special township that is steeped in an ambiance and personality all its own.” By reading this book your will better understand Mel’s statement.
The book is soft-cover, twenty chapters, 132 pages.

Cost: $19.95, plus shipping

Attention all who graduated or attended “Old” Sharon High School on South Main Street with Class of 1960 or earlier!

Would you like to locate friends from your years at “Old” Sharon High? A second edition of the “old” Sharon High Alumni Address Booklet has just recently been published and is now available for purchase at the Sharon Historical Society, the Yellow Schoolhouse Museum at 16 High Street.

Sharon, Massachusetts – A History

Our popular 1976 Bicentennial History is back!
Long out of print, the so-called

“Red Book” of Sharon’s History

has been reprinted in paperback.

Jacket2154R30

From the book jacket:

“ Sharon , ‘A better place to live…

…because it is naturally beautiful,’ has evolved
in two hundred years from a farming community,
to a thriving industrial center, to the
residential town that it is today,” So states the
prologue to the 1976 first edition of
“Sharon, Massachusetts—A History.”

In celebration of the National Bicentennial Year, the
citizens of Sharon set out the history of their New
England town. This group effort represents a wonderful
resource of Sharon history, lore and photography that
every past and present resident is sure to cherish.

Cost: $24.95, plus shipping

More Postcards from the Museum’s Collection

@SharonHistory Facebook Page

We sadly inform our members, viewers, and followers of the death early this morning of our member, Helen Hawkins Hogan. Helen had been a very active member of the Sharon Historical Society, Inc., for many years .... a person who was always willing to help when called upon to volunteer. She enjoyed volunteering as a docent in the museum and could always be seen at our annual yard sales as she & others sat under a tent watching over the baked goods! Helen was a well-known teacher at the Cottage Street School, a member of Fortnightly Club of Sharon and the Sharon Garden Club. She also had a passion for playing bridge and was an avid reader. Her grandfather Hawkins had been a member of several Sharon Town Committees. In recent years Helen was a resident of Wingate of Sharon. Her death was due to complications from Covid-19 virus. Helen was the wife of the late John Hogan and mother of Beth, Maureen and Michael Hogan. She will be greatly missed by all who knew her. May she rest in peace. ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook.com

To our faithful members, friends, viewers and followers of the Sharon Historical Society and its Facebook page, we wish you a HAPPY THANKSGIVING!

Many thanks and blessings to our first responders, the Sharon Fire and the Sharon Police departments, the DPW, and our Town Officials for all they do for our townspeople and for the support they have given us this past year. How lucky we are to live in Sharon. May this day be a memorable day; it's one that will be a historical day, different than any we have experienced! Enjoy it as best you can and hope and pray better days will soon be here.
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook.com

Thank you to our friend, Dwight MacKerron, president of the Stoughton Historical for searching for an advertisement showing Withington & Lowe Funeral Directors. Dwight sent a picture of the ad and, in the meantime, I also found the same ad in an 1898 Business Directory of Sharon, Foxboro and Mansfield. As Dwight had mentioned, please note these gentlemen had a "Lady Assistant!" and they were "Up to date FURNITURE DEALERS" with sites in both Sharon & Stoughton; the Sharon store being in the Workman's Building on South Main Street at corner of East Chestnut Street (see post below published yesterday). This tells us the old building had to have been constructed sometime before 1898! ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook.com

This building, known as the Workman's Building, was on South Main Street at the corner of East Chestnut St. CVS's parking lot is now there. As you see, the main tenant was Withington and Lowe, undertakers, also known as funeral directors! It was not a funeral parlor since in years now long ago., what we call visiting hours or wakes, were observed in the home of the deceased. In this store caskets and other supplies could be purchased. Years later Mr. Lowe went into business with Mr. Powers and together they opened the Lowe and Powers Funeral Home in Stoughton. At that time Sharon did not have a funeral home; thus, many Sharon families used the Lowe & Powers Funeral Home for visiting, wakes and often funeral services. I believe before this building was demolished, Saunders' Drug Store was at this location. Upstairs was a beautiful space where meetings and dancing lessons were held. On the first floor, around the corner facing East Chestnut Street, Mrs. Kane, wife of Matt Kane, a SHS custodian, had a little restaurant called "Harmony Lunch." Kids from the High School often went across So Main St. to have their lunch there rather that have the school lunch! Note house on East Chestnut Street still remains at that site! ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook.com

Today we are expressing our congratulations to Dave and Gail Martin, long-time active members of Sharon Historical Society, Inc., both of whom are marathon runners. Today they accomplished a goal set a couple years ago which was to run every street in Sharon. Their last street to run was Norwood Street to the Walpole line. It is now history!

P..S. They have also run in all 50 states of USA, plus Iceland and Antarctica.

If there are other members who have accomplished this goal please let us know; we do not want to overlook you
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook.com

On behalf of the "official" Sharon Historical Society, Inc., THANK YOU EVER SO MUCH for leaving this framed picture at the front door of our Yellow Schoolhouse Museum on High Street. Sorry we do not know who you are!!! It is very fortunate one of our members happened to notice an object there as she was driving by the museum and stopped and then brought it to me (Shirley Schofield). Perhaps the individual who left it there did not observe the sign saying the museum was closed due to Covid-19 Pandemic. However, it was unfortunate the picture had not been wrapped nor put in a plastic bag as water had seeped inside the frame. It WAS fortunate though the picture did not get wet. However, after removing the backing we found the picture and two pieces of cardboard inside frame were quite damp; thus, they were laid out to dry and then put between books to flatten! Written on the back of the frame was: "John Randall Homestead, Sharon, Mass., South Main Street, Built 1776." The handwriting appeared to me being that of Katharine Cartwright who lived at 148 South Main Street. She was one of the founding members of the "official" Sharon Historical Society, Inc. and was also known as Sharon's Official Historian!" Also on the back was a label advertising "Powers Photography, Boylston Street, Boston." It could very well have been Stillman Powers, who, during the 1920s and 1930s was a well-known photographer here in Sharon.. Many of his photos were used as postcards; this picture of the Randall Homestead was one of them. I recall Mrs. Cartwright telling me the Randall Homestead was on the right side of South Main Street at the bottom of the hill opposite Gertrude Ave. Our museum has been closed to the public since mid-March and yes, we are very anxious for it to open once again, We are hoping it will be happening soon ,,, we are looking forward to greeting you at a grand reopening celebration! ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook.com

Tomorrow, November 11th, the Town of Sharon will celebrate VETERANS DAY with a special program honoring our veterans of all wars. It will be held on the grounds of the Town Hall, East Chestnut St. at 11 a.m. Speakers will be a member of the Select Board and Senator Timility. You are asked to wear masks and to observe the social distancing of at least 6' from those near you. Sharon's two memorials are near by; take time to read names of those who fought in World War I and World War II. Following the program, members of the American Legion, Charles R. Wilber Post #106, invite you to a small collation on the grounds of their headquarters on South Main Street, diagonally across from Shaw's Plaza, near Route 95. ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook.com

CNNDuring the "Resort Era Years," the late 1800s to about 1940s, Sharon had been known as one of the healthiest towns in New England. Here in Sharon there were many hotels, inns and boarding houses, and two sanitoriums back then. According to Mr. Roy Griffith of Griffith-Skillings Press, Boston, the author of the manuscript written in "Sharon the Beautiful," a book published in 1912, "Sharon air is keen and clear, and free from heaviness and damp; the pulse quickens under it, and it heartens and enlivens. Sharon is indeed nature's favorite; that she was given loveliness seems not to have been enough, for she has been granted in greater measure, besides, the more valuable possession, health. Sharon is without question the most healthful town in New England." Mr Griffith goes on to talk about "the water of Sharon being a fit companion to its air in purity and healthfulness. Not one drop of water flows into Sharon from any other town, Sharon being the watershed of three rivers." Pictured here is the Garten Sanitorium that was once located on Beach Street near the intersection of Cedar and Gunhouse streets. Unfortunately, we have no information about this site other than we know that McElroy's Lakeview Hotel had been here possibly following the closure of the Garten Sanitorium. Many of our viewers do recall the Sharon Sanitorium on Everett Street of which Dr. Walter A. Griffin was Director. It later became the Kendall Whaling Museum site and presently is owned by the Massachusetts Trustees of Reservation. ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook.com

SHARON TO CELEBRATE VETERANS DAY!
Because of Covid-19 Pandemic, this year's Veterans Day program will take place surrounding the Flag Pole in front of the Town Hall on East Chestnut Street, according to Paul Bergeron, Sharon's Veterans Agent. The ceremony will take place Wednesday, November 11th at 11 a.m. honoring all veterans. You are asked to wear masks and to observe social distancing of 6 feet or more. Only a limited amount of people may attend. Clergy will offer prayers. There will be a speaker from the Select Board and also Senator Timilty has been invited to speak. Five military branch markers will be dedicated. At the conclusion of ceremony, it is suggested you walk over toward South Main St., to view names of those who served in World War I and World War II listed on separate monuments. Sharon Cablevision is expected to film the program which will be shown later enabling all those who want to view the annual event to do so.
Two pictures below show Sharon Historical Society's table at 2019 Veterans Day celebration in the Square, along with picture of the crowd listening to one of the speakers. Other pictures show Historical Society members preparing the Society's 2019 annual display in their museum (sadly we are unable to have our annual display this year); a close up picture of Purple Heart Medal and finally, a picture of Charles R. Wilber, a name of which many of you have heard but have never seen his picture. He was the only serviceman from Sharon killed during World War I.
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook.com

Shown here is an architect's rendering of Frederick Mansfield's proposed Sharon Atla Hotel that Mr. Mansfield was hoping to build on Belcher Street in the late 1800s. However, it never happened but instead, a beautiful Victorian style house was built on the property for Mr. Mansfield and his family. It remains there today. F. Mansfield & Son were proprietors of the Atla Bay Path Beverage Company that was at the end of Belcher Street approximately where the Sharon Sportsmen's Club is today. The company made flavored soda beverages. Shown here is a bottle cap from a bottle of coffee flavored soda. Water used for the soda was pure spring water from a spring in the area. The hotel rendering and bottle cap are in the vast archives collection of the official Sharon Historical Society, Inc., 16 High Street.
As many of you know we have been following the advice of Gov. Charlie Baker and have remained closed due to the Covid-19 Pandemic. Because we have so many objects such as photos, documents, books, post cards, etc. to sanitize it is a time-consuming project; and plus all that, we have had some very serious internal challenges. Information is posted on our website: www.sharonhistoricalsociety.org. We are thankful and very grateful for the help and support of our 300 plus members. We hope our problems will soon be rectified.
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook.com

During the "Resort Era Years," the late 1800s to about 1940s, Sharon had been known as one of the healthiest towns in New England. Here in Sharon there were many hotels, inns and boarding houses, and two sanitoriums back then. According to Mr. Roy Griffith of Griffith-Skillings Press, Boston, the author of the manuscript written in "Sharon the Beautiful," a book published in 1912, "Sharon air is keen and clear, and free from heaviness and damp; the pulse quickens under it, and it heartens and enlivens. Sharon is indeed nature's favorite; that she was given loveliness seems not to have been enough, for she has been granted in greater measure, besides, the more valuable possession, health. Sharon is without question the most healthful town in New England." Mr Griffith goes on to talk about "the water of Sharon being a fit companion to its air in purity and healthfulness. Not one drop of water flows into Sharon from any other town, Sharon being the watershed of three rivers." Pictured here is the Garten Sanitorium that was once located on Beach Street near the intersection of Cedar and Gunhouse streets. Unfortunately, we have no information about this site other than we know that McElroy's Lakeview Hotel had been here possibly following the closure of the Garten Sanitorium. Many of our viewers do recall the Sharon Sanitorium on Everett Street of which Dr. Walter A. Griffin was Director. It later became the Kendall Whaling Museum site and presently is owned by the Massachusetts Trustees of Reservation. ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook.com

Since soon after the Sharon Historical Society, Inc., officially organized in 1982, we began fund raisers. Our goal was to eventually have a building of our own which we finally did have constructed and opened at 16 High Street in September of 1999. From the very beginning of our organizing, we had many fairs, such as a Transportation Fair and Craft Fairs, trolley and bus tours, but our major fund raisers through the years were Yard Sales. For many years, prior to opening our museum, sales were held at Kendall's "Red Barn" on South Main Street. We had just one week to price items and decorate the inside of the barn where the very special items such as antiques were displayed and sold. Pricing was done in the cold basement below. It was an ideal site for us as there was much traffic on South Main St. People stopped to shop, have coffee and chatted with our friendly workers, some of whom you can see pictured here. These pictures were taken in June 1998 - the last year we used this location. The next year, although the museum was not quite finished, we were able to use our very own site in June 1999. FYI, we also had a very successful Capital Campaign, raising enough money to go ahead with construction without taking out a mortgage .... thanks to so many donors, Sharon Banks and the Sharon Credit Union.. As you know, our Museum and Carriage House have been closed since Mid-March due to the Covid-19 Pandemic. We hope we will be able to welcome you to our facilities once we are able to go through the process of following instructions for opening museums as is required.. In the meantime, please continue to follow us on this page,
the official Sharon Historical Society's Facebook page and also on our website: www.sharonhistoricalsociety.org
Please click on each picture to enlarge and to read description of each photo.
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook.com

Foliage is still beautiful here in Sharon; take time to walk, bike, or drive around town. No matter what street you go on, the colors are truly bright this year. These pictures were submitted to the Sharon Historical Society, Inc., Face Book page by Peg Arguimbau, Chair of Sharon's Conservation Committee and a long time active member of our organization. Pictures are of the Arguimbau/Deborah Sampson Gannett Farm, Sharon Fish and Game Club on East Street and Hammershop Pond, Ames Street. This map will help you find Sharon's historical sites as you enjoy riding around town enjoying the scenery! ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook.com

Look who is saying "Hello" to you. It is "Fred" who lives at the Arguimbau's "Deborah Sampson Farm" on East Street. We understand cars often slow down as they pass by the farm because their passengers are looking for Fred who often can be seen grazing in the field! Thank you to Dan & Peg
Arguimbau for sharing this picture with us. They are long time active members of the official Sharon Historical Society, Inc.
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook.com

We have been extremely saddened to learn of the deaths of two long-time and well-known former Sharon residents who passed away within a month of each other. Don Farwell, 97, former Sharon Town Treasurer for eighteen years, died suddenly September 13, 2020 and his wife of 71 years, Beverly Farwell, 95, passed away on October 14, 2020. Bev had been a teacher in the Sharon School system, first teaching at the Pleasant Street School and for many years at Cottage Street School. She retired in 1986 after 40 years of teaching and they then moved back to Mattapoisett where they had grown up. They both had graduated from Fairhaven High School prior to attending separate colleges. They had been active parishioners of the First Congregational Church of Sharon. Certainly many of our viewers have happy memories of Don and Bev Farwell. We would love to have you share your memories with other viewers of our Face Book page.. ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook.com

We have just received these two pictures taken at one of Sharon's once favorite sites for ice skating! These two pictures of same view (one closer than the other) were taken by Peg (Dowd) Argumibau earlier this cloudy morning (October 12, 2020). Peg quoted Dorothy who said, "next time I go looking for my hearts desire, I won't look any farther than my own back yard...!" There are many other sites in Sharon that are colorful; no need to drive miles to see beautiful foliage. This scene is actually an historical site remembered by older generations. Yes, many of us remember hiking up to "The San" to skate on their pond once alongside Upland Road. Do you remember skating on the frozen stream, through the woods, ending at Dr. Griffin's meadow? Also many " pickup" hockey games were played here. Thanks, Peg .... Happy Memories! ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook.com

Are you aware, "without the past we would not have the future?" Many objects, buildings, etc., should be retained for future generations to be able to observe. These two pictures showing the once-upon-a-time water trough in Post Office Square were taken from the 1912 book, "Sharon the Beautiful." The trough, designed by Henry Jenks, was at the sight in front of the Pettee & Colburn's store until sometime in the early 1920s when the beautiful elm tree was removed and the area was tarred over. On the common in Wrentham there is an identical copy of this water trough. Several years ago there was a discussion of the subject with the Board of Selectmen, now known as the Select Board. Sharon now has an opportunity to bring a Henry Jenks water trough back to us. Many thanks to J. J. McGrath, retired Sharon Deputy Chief of Police, a retired member of Sharon's Board of Selectmen, and a member of the "official" Sharon Historical Society, Inc., who has an interest in preserving Sharon's history. The "official" Sharon Historical Society, Inc., wishes to remind residents of tomorrow's 255th Town Meeting - an historical event for our Town - and a special event since it is going to be held outdoors under a tent (October 12th @ 1 p.m.)! Location is Sharon High School's Football Field, 181 Pond Street. There will be discussion under Warrant Article No. 7. Money needed is minor in comparison to other projects. Save the past for the future! -- opinion written by Shirley Schofield, Sharon's Unofficial Town Historian. ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook.com

The SHARON SPRING HOUSE on Massapoag Avenue was once the summer home of George and Kate Morrell. In the past other views of this site have been posted on this FB page. During the winter months George and Kate resided at the well-known Parker House in Boston. George was a philanthropist who owned acres of land in Sharon. One site was on South Pleasant Street. He was the donor of land on which the Pleasant Street School was built and opened circa 1909. Behind the school was an acre of land that became the Kate Morrell Park. Mr. Morrell requested the Town residents use the site for "passive" recreation; that meant sitting on a bench reading or meditating ... not for sports! Years later, before the trees started taking over, the neighborhood kids did enjoy using that lot of land for sports! It did eventually revert back to a park when the granddaughter of the Morrells came from California to Sharon to view sites owned by her grandparents. She had an opportunity to talk with Sharon's then Town Administrator who arranged to have the "Park" cleaned up and flowering bushes added ... plus adding a sign saying "Kate Morrell Park," made by students at Southeastern Regional Technical High School!

Following the deaths of Mr. & Mrs. Morrell, what was their private summer home, became the Sharon Spring House and later became known as Carvin's Inn, Corman's Inn and, finally, the Green Manor .... on land where the street, Manor Lane, is today.
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook.com

We are writing to send news of a positive process of mediation that all sides of the Sharon Historical Society are engaged in. Both earlier meetings of October 7th and 8th were to have focused on status updates of the Sharon Historical Society. The planned elections for Nov 12th and Dec. 13th have been canceled. We feel we'll be in a better position to discuss these topics as we work through the process.

Thank you for your support of the Sharon Historical Society, Inc. We will
keep you posted as we look forward to a positive future for the Sharon
Historical Society, Inc.

Sincerely,

Gary Sullivan
Don Williams
Shirley Schofield
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook.com

Many of you have heard the name Tisdale. The person you see here with his oxen and cart, standing in front of his homestead, is Abijah Tisdale. This picture taken in late 1800s was sent to the Sharon Historical Society, Inc., by a descendent of Mr. Tisdale. The Tisdale family owned several acres of land on Mountain Street, not too far from Bay Road. Also on the farm was a huge barn off to the left and some out buildings, as well. The house had been there until about 1987 when it was destroyed by fire. Being such a distance from Sharon, Stoughton, and Easton fire departments the house had nearly burned down to the ground by the time the fire trucks arrived. The land is now owned by Borderland State Park. On the site there is signage that gives you a little history about the Tisdales. Nearby, on the opposite side of the street (and in Sharon), is the Tisdale Cemetery which continues to be the burial grounds of Tisdale family descendents. Abijah Tisdale donated land at the corner of Mountain St., and Bay Road in the 1870s for the Bay Street Chapel. It was completed in 1876 and was dedicated November 10, 1876. The chapel was in existence for a number of years before attendance lowered and the building was finally abandoned. The tax-free property eventually became the property of Town of Sharon. Stoughton Historical Society has a few diaries once belonging to Erastus Smith who was a founding member of the Bay Street Chapel. We look forward to your comments and your continued support.
We also want to remind you to mail in your ballot that was inside the August issue of our Heritage Hunter. Remember we are the official Sharon Historical Society, Inc.
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook.com

To you all - our members, our viewers, our followers, we are continuing as the OFFICIAL SHARON HISTORICAL SOCIETY, INC. It is us, not that other group who are using our title, our mail box, our money; we are the group that received our Articles of Organization and our 501(c)-3 Non-Profit Organization status in 1982. We realize you are confused by way of the mailings they have sent out, telephone calls you have received, their posts on other Face Book pages. They have done the unimaginable to us and are continuing to do so. It is extremely sad to think this internal issue was started by someone doing such a thing to our organization of which she was once a part. Over the years we have had many events (our list is 'way too long to publish); thus, we are showing you just a few pictures taken in recent years....Yard Sales, Sharing Sharon Memories, Honoring our local Veterans who served in all Wars, Walking Tours of Rock Ridge Cemetery and the area of the Square, Annual Display of Antique Cars, the Square Jam. We have done so much since 1982 to enlighten our residents about the history of Sharon and preserving it for our future generations. The false group only organized within the past year. We look forward to your continued support and your comments. ---Shirley Harris Schofield, Past President ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook.com

There has been many hurricanes over these past several years, some of which have been extremely devastating. The first one I recall was the no-name "Hurricane of 1938!" Please excuse me if I am repeating what I posted a year ago ... it is what I remember of that day, September 21, 1938. I was a fifth grade student at the Pleasant Street School, actually on South Pleasant St., now an apartment complex of the Sharon Housing Authority. This hurricane "creeped" up on us without any warning. We were dismissed from school at the usual time of 3 o'clock .... once outside there were strong winds blowing. My mom had promised my younger brother who was in 3rd grade at High Street School she would pick him up after school and then pick me up. She would drive to Norwood to buy "Buzzie" a football. As we drove along Norwood St., I remember seeing the pine trees moving back & forth due to the wind. Luckily, we made it over to the Sporting Goods Store on Broadway, Norwood and back to Sharon with Buzz anxious to get home with his football. I do recall the Town was without electricity for a couple of weeks; many of our beautiful trees throughout the town were uprooted and, unfortunately, Robert Davis, a high school student lost his life when a huge branch fell upon him. It certainly was a memorable, historical day not only in Sharon but along the eastern coast and in most of New England. The larger picture was taken at intersection of Moose Hill Parkway & Upland Rd., the smaller picture is 211 East Street. ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook.com

To our Jewish friends ..... tonight the Sharon Historical Society, Inc. sends good wishes to each of you and your families as you celebrate Rosh Hashanah and the beginning of your high holy days. May you take time to reflect, renew and envision the future wherever you may be. ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook.com

Today we ask you to pause to take time to remember all those who lost their lives on September 11th, nineteen years ago. Ceremonies are taking place all over the country at this moment; it is a day none of us should forget. As you reflect, we want to be sure you remember Michael Rothberg, a Sharon resident who graduated from Sharon High in Class of 1980. In his memory his parents donated the beautiful clock that is on the grounds of Sharon's Town Hall at corner of East Chestnut and South Main streets. Also, in a ceremony nineteen years ago, the Sharon Post Office was named in honor of Michael Rothberg. ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook.com