Members Take Notice:

Please take a moment to read this very important update from Past President, Shirley Schofield, and all directors of the Sharon Historical Society, on September 19th, 2020, regarding our upcoming election! Thank you!

Sharon Historical Society

Sharon, Massachusetts

Where the past is always present!

Preserving the heritage of Sharon for 42 years!

Admission is FREE!

 

About Sharon Historical Society & the “Yellow Schoolhouse” Museum

Our Mission: The Sharon Historical Society was founded to promote the research, study, dissemination, publication and recording of the history of the Town of Sharon, Massachusetts.

 

Street Address: 16 High Street, Sharon, MA 02067-0175, just up the street from the historic Sharon Public Library, in Post Office Square

 

Open Hours: Out of concern for the health of our membership and collections, the Sharon Historical Society has temporarily suspended regularly scheduled open hours, to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

The Yellow Schoolhouse Museum is accessible to those who are physically challenged. Parking is available behind the museum or at the adjacent Municipal Parking Lot.

 

October 8, 2020 at 7:30PM EST
A membership video-conference meeting, seeking nominations to the board of directors will be held.
November 12, 2020 at 7:30PM EST
Our next Annual meeting will be held via video-conference, with an election of directors.

  • As our bylaws require, a meeting seeking the participation of the fullest quorum of membership available, to offer an opportunity for member participation in the Society’s direction, is held once per Quarter. These meetings may be the opportunity for elections to the board of directors. See more information on elections in our bylaws and policies.
  • The SHS Board of Directors typically meet the 4th Thursday of the month at 7:30PM, unless otherwise stated here, on Facebook, or in the Quarterly Heritage Hunter newsletter.

Historical Views Around Sharon Center

Pettees Store c1920

Pettee's Store, PO Square circa 1920

SMainSt c1905

South Main Street circa 1905

Town Hall c1905

Town Hall circa 1905

Pettees Store c1920

Pettee's Store, PO Square circa 1920

SMainSt c1905

South Main Street circa 1905

Town Hall c1905

Town Hall circa 1905

Updates

September 19th, 2020

A Letter from Shirley Schofield

Dear Members of the Sharon Historical Society:

Last December, an annual election was held. That election violated the Society’s established procedural protocols and immediately sparked a crisis of leadership on the Board of Directors.

At the March 2020 Quarterly Meeting, the membership voted overwhelmingly to invalidate that flawed election process and to restore the Board as previously constituted. The re-instated Board worked diligently to appoint members to vacant Board seats, revise the Society’s bylaws, plan for a new election and work to secure and administer the Society during an unprecedented internal crisis, as well as a worldwide pandemic.

A few members continued to oppose the work of the Board and, instead, actively sought to thwart the direction of the membership. These efforts to intimidate and bully on the part of a few rogue members cannot and should not be allowed to overwhelm the continued efforts of the Society and its Board to advance the mission that has been our foundation since 1982.

I encourage you to visit our website at www.SharonHistoricalSociety.org to read the official minutes of the meetings referenced here and decide for yourself.

The Society recently mailed the August 2020 Heritage Hunter newsletter and ballot which outlines the current situation and the path forward. Please refer to your copy of the Heritage Hunter for instructions on how to virtually attend critically important, upcoming meetings on October 8 and the Annual Meeting on November 12, and how to submit your ballot. We hope you will make your voice heard and we appreciate your continued support of the Sharon Historical Society Inc., as we plan for a stronger, brighter future.

Very respectfully submitted,

Shirley Schofield
Past President

A Letter from Shirley Schofield

August 21st, 2020

Dear Members of the Sharon Historical Society:
We are all negotiating challenging times. On top of the usual life challenges, we are doing our best to protect each other from the risks of the latest virus. We hope that you are staying safe. Even though the museum is closed, you can be sure that we are taking steps to maintain the facility and protect our precious artifacts. You are encouraged to visit our website www.sharonhistoricalsociety.org for important updates.
As members of the Sharon Historical Society, we are also working our way through internal challenges and your support is needed more than ever. We are looking forward to getting the pandemic under control and returning FUN to our society. We hope that you join with us during the upcoming virtual membership meeting and fully participate in the upcoming election. You will be able to join by your computer or by your cell phone.
We want to remember all of our members and friends who have moved onto the great historical society in the sky. We are dedicating this year’s annual election in the memory of our longtime, dedicated member and my fellow SHS Class of ’46 classmate and friend, Bob Parrish.

 

Sincerely, 
Shirley Schofield
Past President

A Letter from Ernie Varitimos

August 21, 2020

Dear Members of the Sharon Historical Society:
We want to update you on our recent efforts and the current status of the Sharon Historical Society.
During a Special Board Meeting held in June, 2019, it was plainly evident that the Society leadership was struggling. There were a number of grievances that were expressed by a member, who with one or two other members abruptly left the meeting. Based on the inadequacies of the bylaws at that time, efforts were made to develop new ones.

The existing bylaws did then, and still call for a full membership meeting and election be held every June. Due to the turmoil at the time, the meeting was delayed and subsequently held In December, 2019. In March, 2020 a Quarterly Membership meeting was held and various procedural concerns were raised on how the election in December, 2019 was held. The membership voted on and resoundingly supported the nullification of that election and reinstatement of the previous board pending a new election meant to be held in June 2020. You can see the minutes of this meeting by clicking here.

As you all know, the Covid-19 pandemic came to town, resulting in closure of the museum. The Board has continued to manage the day-to-day business and shift into full preparation for an election that is compliant with CDC guidelines.

In May, 2020, we sent out the Heritage Hunter Newsletter and solicited input from the full member-ship. Newly drafted bylaws were posted on our website and all members were invited to review and vote if they supported them. Members were also asked to indicate if they were interested in serving in leadership positions. There was resounding support for the new bylaws and a number of you did indicate willingness to serve as an officer or board member. If you are interested in serving as an officer or on the board of directors, we recommend you review the requirements and duties described in the newly approved bylaws.  See the bylaws and other important updates posted on our website. 

Enclosed with this August, 2020 Heritage Hunter Newsletter is a draft ballot and instructions on how you can participate in the vote. It is essential that we complete this election and your help is critical.

As our Society Matriarch, Shirley Schofield, has requested, we need your support more than ever.

We intend to weather the storms and improve the Sharon Historical Society to a higher operational standard. This will include increasing our member-ship, modernizing our records access so that the public can benefit, while shining a light on the importance of Sharon’s history. Making membership fun and fulfilling is also a priority.

Please join us on October 8, 2020 at 7:30 PM. for our virtual membership and nominating meeting and then again on November 12, 2020 at 7:30 PM for our annual membership meeting and election.

Respectfully,

 

Ernie Varitimos
Clerk/Secretary
Board of Directors

Many of our members rely on this timeline of compiled historical events in Sharon’s history, brought to you by our Past-President, Fmr. Chief Archivist, & Beloved Sharonite, Shirley Harris Schofield.

 

A booklet collection of Sharon memories, by current and fmr. residents of Sharon, including many unique images and post cards, from Sharon’s past!

 

Postcard History of Norfolk County Massachusetts

Paul Tedesco, co-author and publisher

PostcardHistory

A table top book – hardcover with 416 pages
and over 400 illustrations, many in color.

The book, a collaboration by members of each community,
presents the history of Norfolk County and its 28 towns/city
through vintage postcards and much more information.

Cost: $39.95, plus shipping

Sharon, Massachusetts – A History

Our popular 1976 Bicentennial History is back!
Long out of print, the so-called

“Red Book” of Sharon’s History

has been reprinted in paperback.

Jacket2154R30

From the book jacket:

“ Sharon , ‘A better place to live…

…because it is naturally beautiful,’ has evolved
in two hundred years from a farming community,
to a thriving industrial center, to the
residential town that it is today,” So states the
prologue to the 1976 first edition of
“Sharon, Massachusetts—A History.”

In celebration of the National Bicentennial Year, the
citizens of Sharon set out the history of their New
England town. This group effort represents a wonderful
resource of Sharon history, lore and photography that
every past and present resident is sure to cherish.

Cost: $24.95, plus shipping

Sharon-A Destiny Predicted, A Path Followed.

Author Mel Leventhal, long-time Sharon resident

Most of the chapters are related to various subjects about Sharon, its origin, growth, temperance, medicine, schools, religion, industry, zoning, history of ice cream, women in the military and more. Other chapters , including the answer to “Who Was Kilroy?” are the results of a wandering mind!
Mel states “Sharon is a special township that is steeped in an ambiance and personality all its own.” By reading this book your will better understand Mel’s statement.
The book is soft-cover, twenty chapters, 132 pages.

Cost: $19.95, plus shipping

100th Anniversary Edition of “Sharon the Beautiful”

Sharon Historical Society Exclusive

Sharon The Beautiful

Originally printed in 1912 by the Sharon Improvement Association
with text written by J. Eveleth Griffith

Cost: $19.00, plus shipping

Attention all who graduated or attended “Old” Sharon High School on South Main Street with Class of 1960 or earlier!

Would you like to locate friends from your years at “Old” Sharon High? A second edition of the “old” Sharon High Alumni Address Booklet has just recently been published and is now available for purchase at the Sharon Historical Society, the Yellow Schoolhouse Museum at 16 High Street.

More Postcards from the Museum’s Collection

@SharonHistory Facebook Page

There has been many hurricanes over these past several years, some of which have been extremely devastating. The first one I recall was the no-name "Hurricane of 1938!" Please excuse me if I am repeating what I posted a year ago ... it is what I remember of that day, September 21, 1938. I was a fifth grade student at the Pleasant Street School, actually on South Pleasant St., now an apartment complex of the Sharon Housing Authority. This hurricane "creeped" up on us without any warning. We were dismissed from school at the usual time of 3 o'clock .... once outside there were strong winds blowing. My mom had promised my younger brother who was in 3rd grade at High Street School she would pick him up after school and then pick me up. She would drive to Norwood to buy "Buzzie" a football. As we drove along Norwood St., I remember seeing the pine trees moving back & forth due to the wind. Luckily, we made it over to the Sporting Goods Store on Broadway, Norwood and back to Sharon with Buzz anxious to get home with his football. I do recall the Town was without electricity for a couple of weeks; many of our beautiful trees throughout the town were uprooted and, unfortunately, Robert Davis, a high school student lost his life when a huge branch fell upon him. It certainly was a memorable, historical day not only in Sharon but along the eastern coast and in most of New England. The larger picture was taken at intersection of Moose Hill Parkway & Upland Rd., the smaller picture is 211 East Street. ... See MoreSee Less

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To our Jewish friends ..... tonight the Sharon Historical Society, Inc. sends good wishes to each of you and your families as you celebrate Rosh Hashanah and the beginning of your high holy days. May you take time to reflect, renew and envision the future wherever you may be. ... See MoreSee Less

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Today we ask you to pause to take time to remember all those who lost their lives on September 11th, nineteen years ago. Ceremonies are taking place all over the country at this moment; it is a day none of us should forget. As you reflect, we want to be sure you remember Michael Rothberg, a Sharon resident who graduated from Sharon High in Class of 1980. In his memory his parents donated the beautiful clock that is on the grounds of Sharon's Town Hall at corner of East Chestnut and South Main streets. Also, in a ceremony nineteen years ago, the Sharon Post Office was named in honor of Michael Rothberg. ... See MoreSee Less

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It is true every graduate of Sharon High believes their class is the best, as did Sharon High Class of 1946 gathered in this picture. It was the weekend they were celebrating their 45th Class Reunion, shown here with their spouses and/or guests following a Sunday morning brunch. Look carefully, you will see teachers Dorrie Newton and Dorothy Chase who were always invited to the '46 class' reunions every 5 years, since their first reunion that was held 10 years following their graduation. Later in the day those pictured who were from out of town were taken on a bus tour of Sharon to view many of our historical sites. (Bus had limited seating of 28!) This year the few remaining classmates within the local area were looking forward to their 74th reunion which they had planned to celebrate at the 6th Annual Golden Oldies Luncheon on September 25th at the Holiday Inn in Mansfield. Because of the Covid-19 Pandemic the luncheon (which is for all those who graduated or attended Sharon High 50 or more years ago), has been postponed until 2021. ... See MoreSee Less

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This post is an addition to the one posted earlier today about Judah's Massapoag Boat House and other refreshment stands at the lake. I have just found this circa early 1950s picture of the about to be demolished Snack Shop ... on Beach St., near the intersection of Gunhouse St. It is boarded up waiting for a bulldozer to come knock it down. It was small, although there were six booths, kitchen, etc. Where you see the boarded up corner, that is where the large windows from which customers could order "take-out!" Looking beyond the stand is the first of three houses; the second house beyond what you see was the well-known Octagon House, surrounded by beautiful lilac bushes....then a small cottage and finally Scotty's refreshment stand. There had been another old house closer to the rotary but that had burned a couple years previously. Refer to previous post below. ... See MoreSee Less

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Judah's Massapoag Boat House was one of three refreshment stands once on the north side of the lake. The other two were Cliff Jerauld's Snack Shop and Scotty's, owned and operated by Marsden & Eva Scott. All three sites were always packed with customers until the town eventually voted to keep the use of the lake for Sharon residents only. Judah's Stand was on Beach St., just beyond the intersection where Gunhouse & Cedar streets are. As you can see there were rafts here and tables "on the deck." The Snack Shop was closer to Gunhouse St. It was built in early 1940s on land that once was site of Brymmer's Ice House. Unfortunately, when the town decided to remove Beach Street in order to extend the beach front, it subsequently constructed a new Beach St. The Snack Shop was taken by eminent domain as were three houses and Scotty's Stand, as well. Beside being a refreshment stand, Scotty's also rented boats. Following the demise of Judah's, for a few years the grounds became the site from where Fourth of July fireworks were set off. July 4th celebration was no longer at the Sacred Heart Field. For the past several years our great fireworks display on the Fourth has been from a "barge" on the lake. We are hoping by next July the Town will be able to have a display.

As always your comments are greatly appreciated. For information about the official Sharon Historical Society, Inc., please go to our updated website: www.sharonhistoricalsociety.org
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On our Facebook page tonight are a couple pages found in a booklet published in 1901 showing advertisements for a variety of Sharon businesses. Note there are some familiar names here, possibly related to our viewers. However, we have no knowledge of some of them, being one hundred nineteen years ago!!! Please click on each page to enlarge them since the print is small; most show an address such as the Globe Company's Lunch and Ice Cream Parlor was South Main St., opposite Station St. Thus, it must have been near area of Washington Place.

We also would like you to know our website www.sharonhistoricalsociety.org is in the process of being updated...new information and photos have been added and more features will be forthcoming. For one thing, you are now able to get to our Facebook page from the website just by clicking on Facebook page! Enjoy learning about Sharon's past. Remember, your comments are welcomed.
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Please take a moment to read these important letters to our membership from the board of SHS. Also please join us for a nomination video-conference meeting for the next SHS board of directors on October 8th, 2020 at 7:30PM EST, as well as an annual membership meeting, where the election will take place, on November 12, 2020 at 7:30PM EST. Thank you to our members and the broader community, as always, for your support and concern for preservation of our shared history! Read these letters and see our website to find out more about how you can participate or nominate! ... See MoreSee Less

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Today could be considered an historical day here in Sharon as well as all over Massachusetts and most of New England. Many of you may be too young to remember! It was the day when Hurricane Diane hit us! According to Wikipedia it was "the costliest Atlantic hurricane of its time, causing a total of $813.7 million in damage. It first came on to land in Wilmington, NC on August 17, five days after Hurricane Connie had hit in the same area. It did not have the wind force of 1938 Hurricane but it did have extremely high flood levels washing out dams and causing erosion of some streets. It arrived in Sharon August 23, 1955 .... 65 years ago today! It washed away a section of East Street by the Fish & Game Pond, a section of Canton Street in area of the once Sharon Box Company and under the nearby RR bridge and on Billings St., staring about where 146 & 151 Billings are. On Billings Street water started flowing down from a swampy area near High Street extension becoming a stream that flowed out next to 126 Billings and onto the street and downhill fast and furious. I remember it well because we lived in 151 Billings. Our front yard began to wash away so my husband and brother tried diverting the flow of water by putting rocks and logs near the driveway hoping the water would flow in the middle of the street as opposed to along the edge and wash out our front yard. We had not been aware there was a large pipe that carried water from area of the Square down to Mann's Pond. As you can see in this picture Billings Street washed away; some water went off to the right causing a brick patio to wash away from our neighbor's house. A neighbor on our right had a man-made pond in which he kept stocked with trout (he was a great lover of fishing & hunting). The little pond was surrounded with a chain link fence. However, it kept children away from the pond but not water. The heavy rains caused the pond to overflow and the trout came through the openings in the chain links and ended up in our back yard!

Needless to say, new drainage systems were installed in the area affected. Additional flooding came in September & October 1955 but did not cause the damage caused by Hurricane Diane.

This picture and two others can be seen by looking in the 1955 Sharon Town Report.
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A recent post on this Facebook page showed the once-upon-a-time Hammer Shop that had been on this site during the mid-1800s to early 1900s. (see below). This picture was taken May 20, 2018, the day the new dam, spillway and the beautiful surroundings of the pond were dedicated. Since then additional benches have been added. People of all ages have been seen fishing (the pond has been stocked with a variety of fish) while others enjoy relaxing by sitting on a bench enjoying the fresh air and scenery. Isn't it quite a change from then to now? Read about the history of Hammer Shop in the nearby kiosk. ... See MoreSee Less

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Here is a different view of the old Hammer Shop, once at the junction of Quincy, Ames and Cottage streets. This picture was taken from Quincy Street. Cottage Street is shown veering off to the right as it goes up the hill from Ames Street. This area from this corner down Ames to East Street was known as Knife Works Village; the Hammer Shop was a part of the Knife Works, the main building of which was off Ames Street, nearer Deborah Sampson Street. It was the neighbors who gave this building its name because of the constant pounding/hammering of the steel blades used in making knifes.. Prior to becoming the Hammer Shop there had been other business at this site including a sawmill and a grist mill.
It is said the first and second privileges along Massapoag Brook are here at Hammershop Pond. A couple years ago a vast improvement was made to the dam and spillway and the grounds surrounding the area.... an ideal place to fish or just sit and relax on one of the benches.
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It was in April 1991 when townspeople gathered in Post Office Square on a Sunday afternoon for the Desert Storm Rally. The Honor Guard included men from the American Legion, Veterans of Foreign Wars and Jewish War Veterans. The platform held both Town and Government Officials. Members of the Congregational Church Choir sang, accompanied by Craig Stine, their organist playing on the key board.
People of all ages came to express their support for those who participated in the Persian Gulf War. Photo memories, with captions, are found in "Sharon, Reflections of the Past." The book, with many pictures of Sharon in the past was put together by members of the Sharon Historical Society. It was published and money raised went toward the Society's Capital Campaign to raise funds to construct the Society's Yellow Schoolhouse Museum at 16 High Street, the home of the official Sharon Historical Society that opened in September 1999. Although still closed due to the Covid-19 Pandemic, the Society's Board of Directors is making plans to open soon.
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There are so many different scenes of Sharon's greatest asset, Lake Massapoag. Many fishermen know this location! In 1910 when this picture was taken this site was known as "The Cove." Years later it became known as "Fletcher's Cove." The Fletcher family lived in the very last house on Beach Road (at the 'point") that overlooked this area. What a wonderful view of the lake from that spot! It has been said "even today the fishing is still good in Fletcher's Cove!" Is this true? Any fishermen willing to comment? ... See MoreSee Less

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2 months ago

Sharon Historical Society

The Board of Directors would again like to thank our members for the input they recently provided by submitting their Membership Information form from our last newsletter. We want you to know that we are diligently working toward holding our annual election of officers and board members.

As you know our previous bylaws and our newly approved bylaws propose that we hold an annual full membership meeting and election in June. Due to COVID-19 challenges we continue to have the museum closed. We are doing our best to develop an alternative way to hold a membership meeting. We have had internal problems and more recently there has been some recent interference with our postal service, but we are working through this.

Our new goal is to conduct a full membership virtual meeting. Stand by for more details in our next Heritage Hunter newsletter. Again, we appreciate the continued support of our members and our many friends! Stay Safe!!

Board of Directors
Sharon Historical Society
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This is a story about a young Sharon boy and his wagon that is seen parked on the sidewalk on South Main Street very close to our once beloved old Victorian Town Hall. The era of the story was about 1910 when South Main Street was still a dirt road and the trolley tracks ran down the middle of the street. The youngster was a very ambitious child, eager to make some money! He collected bottles! He knew where the older men hung out to drink in the evening. Apparently there were several locations even though at that time Sharon was a dry town. Early in the morning he would pick up the empty bottles, then return them to be refilled, according to our source of information. It appears the youngster was ahead of his time when it came to recycling and the opportunity to "earn a buck!'

He also delivered groceries using the wagon, perhaps many families ordered "delivery service" from the nearby Long Brothers Store on East Chestnut Street which was fairly close to the location where this picture was taken.

Seen in the background is the large Withington & Lowe building at corner of South Main & East Chestnut streets. They were undertakers! Mr. Lowe eventually became a partner of Mr. Powers and their business called the Lowe & Powers Funeral home remained very active for many years in Stoughton...
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There may be some life-long residents of Sharon who do not know of this hidden gem .... The Sharon Tennis Club - a private club for Sharon residents only. Those wanting to play have their name added to a list which, at times, may take a year or two or longer, before a spot opens up!

The Club is between the RR Station and Beaver Brook. It was formed just after the turn of the century, maybe 1902-04, by a few individuals interested in playing tennis regularly. Dr. Walter A. Griffin was one of them. The group received permission to construct 2 clay courts on Sharon Water Dept. land. According to an article written by Richard Hosmer, Sr.,in the book, "Sharon, Massachusetts - A History," the site in the woods was selected because of its privacy that permitted Sunday tennis. Many people had frowned upon such activities on the Sabbath. As the story says, "originally there was a small clubhouse and a water tower which was filled with water pumped from Beaver Brook and used to moisten the clay courts." (Note the pump in this picture). .For more information on this site, there is a lengthy article and pictures in the 250th Anniversary of Sharon published in 2015.
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During the early 1900s the Fuller Farm was one of the many active farms in Sharon. It was located at the corner of what was then Viaduct Street at the intersection of Dedham Street. Today Viaduct Street, is known as Edge Hill Road! In the 1930s-40s it was owned by Fred & Laura Purdy. Fred was a breeder of foxes and a lover of fishing. He had constructed a pond at the lower part of his property abutting the street and his driveway. It became known as Purdy's Trout Farm. Adults as well as youngsters enjoyed going there to fish for trout and/or to practice their casting! The house is still there while some of the outbuildings and barn have changed or been removed. At the Historical Society's Yellow Schoolhouse Museum at 16 High Street, there is a binder that contains pictures of the many farms once in Sharon. We hope you will visit us when the museum is once again open to the public. While visiting the museum and the Carriage House you will see many treasures from Sharon's past. ... See MoreSee Less

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It was a fun day back in the early 1940s when students took over governing the Town of Sharon for a day! Students sought votes, a mock election was held in the gymnasium and then followed a special day when the winners would each go to their "office!" Bob Lindberg (also known as "Lindy), shown sitting in a front end loader; was elected head of the Dept. of Public Works; the three members of the Board of Selectmen were Charlie Lindberg, Fran Condon & Barbara Condon,(now Barbara Waters); Head of the Board of Health was Helen Hawkins, (now Helen Hogan) holding a sign that says Measles; and Tree Warden for the Day was Buzzie Harris shown with Tree Warden George Hart. They learned all about their positions from the true individuals in charge of the various town departments at that time. A great experience for each one! Please click on the pictures to enlarge (particularly the 3 Selectmen, as the BOS was known then! Your comments will also be appreciated. ... See MoreSee Less

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Here is another picture of Pleasant Street just beyond 14 Pleasant St. This shows you Lawncrest Inn, not seen in the picture shown earlier this past week. Pleasant Street was once North Pleasant St., as South Pleasant started on the opposite side of Depot St.! Lawncrest was situated about where #20 is now. Gail Snyderman and others .... in the distance, on the left, is #24 Pleasant St., the house that has recently been completely renovated! In the 1930s Albert & Katherine Urann owned the property. For many years he was an Assessor for Town of Sharon. Later the house became the property of their son, John, and his family. The house on the right, # 9 Pleasant Street was owned by the Stolar Family. The street must have been beautiful once the leaves appeared on the trees. ... See MoreSee Less

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REMINDER TO ALL SHARON HISTORICAL SOCIETY MEMBERS ..............................

IF YOU HAVEN'T YET MAILED IN THE FORM INCLUDED IN LAST NEWSLETTER, IT IS SUGGESTED YOU DO SO BY SATURDAY; THE 11TH. MAIL TO P.O. BOX 1, SHARON, MA 02067. DEADLINE FOR RECEIVING IS WEDNESDAY, JULY 15TH. CONTACT donalddnwilliams@aol.com WITH QUESTIONS. THANK YOU.
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Can you guess where in Sharon this house is located? Some of you may have lived close to it or perhaps passed it every day! Picture was photographed looking from Depot Street toward North Pleasant St (as it was once called). It should be familiar to those who once lived in the neighborhood or passed it walking to the train every day! In the early 1900s, A. D. Colburn owned the house on the corner and D. H. Pettee owned the large house just down the street. The Colburn's son married the Pettee's daughter and then that couple had one son who they named Dwight Pettee Colburn! He became very well-known in Sharon. For several years Dwight Colburn was a member & Chairman of Sharon's Board of Selectmen and he also was the President of the Sharon Cooperative Bank. The two families were original owners of "Your favorite store since '54" known as Pettee and Colburn Company since 1854 but later to be called just plain "Pettee's" which included the meat market, hardware section and the drygoods section (later to be known as "the Country Store ... where many of you bought penny candy!!!) We will be happy to read your comments and to have you share memories! ... See MoreSee Less

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Picture shown was taken in the early 1900s. The large house and barn on the left was once the property of Dennis Desmond. He also rented boats that could be launched from the landing across from his house. Note the dirt road before being surfaced .... but, years later was torn up in order for the beachfront to be extended. It was about 1947 and after the old house had been empty for many years and condemned and soon to be demolished was there a bonfire at the lake on July Fourth of that year! That site is now where the present day boat landing is. ... See MoreSee Less

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