Sharon Historical Society

Sharon, Massachusetts

Where the past is always present!

Preserving the heritage of Sharon for 42 years!

Admission is FREE!

 

About Sharon Historical Society & the “Yellow Schoolhouse” Museum

Our Mission: The Sharon Historical Society was founded to promote the research, study, dissemination, publication and recording of the history of the Town of Sharon, Massachusetts.

 

Street Address: 16 High Street, Sharon, MA 02067-0175, just up the street from the historic Sharon Public Library, in Post Office Square

 

Open Hours: Out of concern for the health of our membership and collections, the Sharon Historical Society has temporarily suspended regularly scheduled open hours, to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

The Yellow Schoolhouse Museum is accessible to those who are physically challenged. Parking is available behind the museum or at the adjacent Municipal Parking Lot.

 

Historical Views Around Sharon Center

Pettees Store c1920

Pettee's Store, PO Square circa 1920

SMainSt c1905

South Main Street circa 1905

Town Hall c1905

Town Hall circa 1905

Pettees Store c1920

Pettee's Store, PO Square circa 1920

SMainSt c1905

South Main Street circa 1905

Town Hall c1905

Town Hall circa 1905

Many of our members rely on this timeline of compiled historical events in Sharon’s history, brought to you by our Past-President, Fmr. Chief Archivist, & Beloved Sharonite, Shirley Harris Schofield.

 

A booklet collection of Sharon memories, by current and fmr. residents of Sharon, including many unique images and post cards, from Sharon’s past!

 

100th Anniversary Edition of “Sharon the Beautiful”

Sharon Historical Society Exclusive

Sharon The Beautiful

Originally printed in 1912 by the Sharon Improvement Association
with text written by J. Eveleth Griffith

Cost: $19.00, plus shipping

Postcard History of Norfolk County Massachusetts

Paul Tedesco, co-author and publisher

PostcardHistory

A table top book – hardcover with 416 pages
and over 400 illustrations, many in color.

The book, a collaboration by members of each community,
presents the history of Norfolk County and its 28 towns/city
through vintage postcards and much more information.

Cost: $39.95, plus shipping

Sharon, Massachusetts – A History

Our popular 1976 Bicentennial History is back!
Long out of print, the so-called

“Red Book” of Sharon’s History

has been reprinted in paperback.

Jacket2154R30

From the book jacket:

“ Sharon , ‘A better place to live…

…because it is naturally beautiful,’ has evolved
in two hundred years from a farming community,
to a thriving industrial center, to the
residential town that it is today,” So states the
prologue to the 1976 first edition of
“Sharon, Massachusetts—A History.”

In celebration of the National Bicentennial Year, the
citizens of Sharon set out the history of their New
England town. This group effort represents a wonderful
resource of Sharon history, lore and photography that
every past and present resident is sure to cherish.

Cost: $24.95, plus shipping

Attention all who graduated or attended “Old” Sharon High School on South Main Street with Class of 1960 or earlier!

Would you like to locate friends from your years at “Old” Sharon High? A second edition of the “old” Sharon High Alumni Address Booklet has just recently been published and is now available for purchase at the Sharon Historical Society, the Yellow Schoolhouse Museum at 16 High Street.

Sharon-A Destiny Predicted, A Path Followed.

Author Mel Leventhal, long-time Sharon resident

Most of the chapters are related to various subjects about Sharon, its origin, growth, temperance, medicine, schools, religion, industry, zoning, history of ice cream, women in the military and more. Other chapters , including the answer to “Who Was Kilroy?” are the results of a wandering mind!
Mel states “Sharon is a special township that is steeped in an ambiance and personality all its own.” By reading this book your will better understand Mel’s statement.
The book is soft-cover, twenty chapters, 132 pages.

Cost: $19.95, plus shipping

More Postcards from the Museum’s Collection

@SharonHistory Facebook Page

Boundary Markers and Mile Markers can still be found in Sharon or close by, particularly along Bay Road. In Colonial Times it was a tradition to mark boundaries between towns. Men, often the Selectmen with surveyors, would walk the town's boundaries or lines every two or three years. Granite posts, iron posts or a pile of rocks would mark the site where two towns would meet. Mile markers was just that .... along roads you would see large stones with writing carved in that might say Boston 18 miles or Taunton 10 miles!Also in many towns there were markers that indicated school districts. Years ago Sharon had five school districts: North, South, East, West and Central. Here in Sharon there is at least one marker that can be seen in the woods off Quincy Street and not too far from the Massapoag Trail. On one side of the granite post is the letter "C" for Central on one side and on other side is letter "E" for East. There had been another one on the eastern shore of Lake Massapoag containing the letters "C" and "S," meaning the boundary line for Central and South District schools. The South District School had been located on Lakeview Street near its intersection back then with Mansfield St., (later to become Massapoag Ave.). The East School is still on East Street but now with additions is a private home. (see picture below of original school). The North School had been on Viaduct Street, now known as Edge Hill Road. The school burned in early 1900s but the foundation remained. A private residence was constructed over the once school foundation. The West School also remaining today is on Moose Hill Street near South Main Street. For many years it had been the home of Edward & Maud Belden who raised asparagus on their farm land. It is still a private home. The first Central School was once on the west side of North Main Street near Brook Road. It was later moved to land on the side of the Congregational Church. Eventually, this small building became a second floor of the house at 50 Quincy Street!. In late 1800s a new school was built on School Street, first used as a High School and later as the Centre School after closure of all the District School in 1907. In looking at an 1831 Map of Sharon you will see the location of these sites. However, this map shows the West School was apparently originally located close to where Walpole St., and Old Post Rd now meet. Some time as you walk through the woods you may find a marker indicating the boundary of Sharon with one of its abutting towns! ... See MoreSee Less
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Our Historical Society has received an email from a woman in Colorado who has been working on her family genealogy during the Covid Pandemic. She has sent us this picture containing writing on the back that says, "home of Emma Morse Fishel, Sharon, Massachusetts." The writer states that Isaac and Emma Fishel were Boston residents who married in late 1800s; they had a summer home in Sharon in 1900s. Emma died about 1937. Any information you can give us will be helpful. Please send an email to: sharonhistorical@gmail.com. ... See MoreSee Less
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This is belatedly posted but here is a picture of the Esty Cemetery on East Foxboro Street. It is surrounded by a beautiful old stonewall. The section of the stonewall along the street side was rebuilt by the Sharon DPW a few years ago. Note that some of the headstones have been broken, either because of age or, unfortunately, from vandalism. We need to credit Mr. Arsenault for taking this picture while seeking information for "Find-A-Grave. ... See MoreSee Less
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To all who are interested in learning more about the Sharon Historical Society's newest project titled "Prose, Poetry and Pictures from the Pandemic," you will have an opportunity tonight by watching Sharon Community TV's Channel 8. At 8 p.m. on the Community Events program "Sharon Helps," Hostess Veronica Wiseman will interview two members from the Sharon Historical Society.: Shirley Schofield, Society's oldest, active member and Meg Winikates, Society's newest member. As is mentioned on the flyer posted here on a previous FB post, the Society is seeking submissions of your experiences, thoughts, impressions and remembrances from the Covid-19 Pandemic. The Society would like to compile a collection of information to save for our future generations. Will you help us? Those of you who do not have Cable may view the program on your computer by clicking on Sharoncommunitytv.com ... then click Live Streaming, Schedules, Community Events, Channel 8 and Sharon Helps. Air times on Channel 8 are tonight (4/8/21) at 8 p.m., Friday at 10 a.m. and again at 8 p.m. ... See MoreSee Less
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Last night we wrote about the George Drake Burial Ground situated off Massasoit Road. A viewer then mentioned he lived across from the Esty Cemetery on East Foxboro Street.The Esty Cemetery was established in 1804 adjacent to the Esty Family Homestead that is close to Wolomolopoag St. It is a small graveyard containing 24 graves; the oldest grave is that of William Hewins who died in 1802. John Esty died in 1811. Others buried there have names that are familiar names. Beside Hewins and Esty are Holmes, Greene, Fisher, Earle, Clark and Belcher. Thomas Clark, 1745-1814 was the husband of Mary Lewis Clark, 1754-1833. Thomas and Mary Clark were the parents of Dr. Edwin Clarke who became very well known as the person who made Clarke Bitters. He also added an "E" to his name! Bottles of Clarke Bitters were sold all over the country. Dr. Clarke's business increased so fast that a railroad station had to be built at Sharon Heights in order to ship cartons of the bitters. Clarke Court is where the bitters were made and bottled in aqua colored glass bottles. Today they are collector's items. Enjoy walking through the cemetery. Parking is available at the site parallel with the stone wall. ... See MoreSee Less
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Now is a great time to visit some of Sharon's older cemeteries. Are you aware we have nine cemeteries? And, there are three more that border Sharon and its surrounding towns! This site is in the George Drake Burial Ground in the woods off Massasoit Road which is off Mansfield Street. It contains twenty gravesites. For many years, before Massasoit Road was constructed it was hard to locate the site but some did locate it as it had been badly vandalized over the years. It was on land of the once George Drake Farm. In recent years, and after Massasoit Road was constructed, a Boy Scout from Sharon's Troop 95 chose to clean it up as his Eagle Scout project enabling him to earn his Eagle Scout Award. A pathway now leads from Massasoit Road into the burial ground. A kiosk was also constructed and hopefully still includes history of the cemetery and those who are buried there. This slate headstone is at the grave of Melzar Drake who served in the Revolutionary War as a sixteen year old Drummer Boy. He died in 1812. There is another Drake Cemetery further down Mansfield Street where it becomes Bird Street in Mansfield. It is on the right at the top of a knoll. Eight Drake family members are buried in this small site. Learn about Sharon's past by visiting our cemeteries. If you have questions please email the Sharon Historical Society: sharonhistorical@gmail.com. ... See MoreSee Less
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From teddy-bear hunts to yard signs, from chalk drawings to porch decorations, how have you expressed your creativity and community in the last year? Tell us (and show us!) your ways you've brightened up your neighborhood, and we'll include them in the "Prose, Poetry, and Pictures from the Pandemic" collection! Find more information here: sharonhistoricalsociety.org/pandemic-collection/ #CollectingCovid ... See MoreSee Less
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Many thanks to Dwight McKerron, President of the Stoughton Historical Society, for sending us this post and pictures. This past Monday Dwight led an "expedition" seeking the location of a project by the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers off Bay Road many years ago. It was, in fact, some time during WWII (1941-1945) when the Engineers began searching the East Coast of U.S. for diatomaceous earth. It was prevalent on the West Coast but not on this side of our country. Diatomaceous earth was used for ammunition (gun powder) and is also used as a scouring (cleaning) powder. The Corp of Engineers had an encampment close by in Easton but the "dig" was in Sharon. As this was "Top Secret Information" during the war years not many Sharon residents were aware of this project. On the expedition, the intrepid explorers included Dwight MacKerron and his friend, Stew Sterling, and also Dave Martin and Joe Blansfield, both of whom are members of the Sharon Historical Society. We are pleased this location was finally rediscovered; thank you, guys, for your efforts in searching for it. Should we say it could possibly be classified as another Sharon historical site? ... See MoreSee Less
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Spring is full of traditions and ceremonies around renewal, across many cultures and religions. How did your celebrations change last year at the beginning of the pandemic? What are your plans for this year? Tell us your story or send us your pictures for the "Prose, Poetry, and Pictures from the Pandemic" collection! We welcome submissions from all ages. Submissions may include, but are not limited to, photos, artwork, writings, video. Materials should be submitted by mail to: Sharon Historical Society, PO Box 175, Sharon, MA 02067 Or by email to: sharonhistorical@gmail.com #CollectingCovid ... See MoreSee Less
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Are you interested in contributing to our #CollectingCovid project? Here are a few tips: Submission GuidelinesWhat kinds of things are you interested in collecting? • Written recollections: essays, journal entries, poems, letters, postcards• Visual art: photography, yard and window signs, snapshots, drawings, paintings or other creative endeavors• Ephemera: store signage, handmade masks or other improvised solutions, pictures of your Halloween candy-delivery system or your backyard school-pod-tent, vaccination pins or stickers, time capsules, etc. • Multimedia: Video and audio recordings also welcome! Please consider using a file transfer service for larger digital files. You may submit any piece of history as hard-copies or as digital submissions. Materials should be submitted by mail to:Sharon Historical Society, PO Box 175, Sharon, MA 02067Or by email to: sharonhistorical@gmail.com How will my submission be used?As a reminder, by submitting a written, visual, or three-dimensional object, you are giving the Sharon Historical Society permission to use it in any or all of the following ways:• Reproduction in whole or in part for the purposes of marketing, digital or print publication, merchandising, or exhibit (digital or physical)• Accession into the Sharon Historical Society archives & collections, or deaccession at some future date if so determined by the Society archivist• Access to researchers using Sharon Historical Society collections in present or futureIf you are unwilling to give your permission for all the above, please indicate what permissions you do give, in writing, when you submit your piece of history. Who is eligible to submit?Anyone! Any person of any age from anywhere – we are interested in telling as wide a variety of stories as we can. What if I only want to lend something?Please make sure you indicate in writing that you would like your object returned to you at the end of the exhibit when you submit, and what you are willing to let the Society do with images or excerpts of your piece (marketing, display, archival records, reproduction for publication, etc.). How long are you collecting? For inclusion in the initial launch of our physical and/or digital exhibit, please submit by the end of June, 2021. However, we will continue to accept submissions related to the pandemic for the foreseeable future. ... See MoreSee Less
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A favorite picture of many of our viewers! This is a postcard previously shown but with so many new viewers who may not have seen it, we decided to show it again. The card is also pictured on our website; it was printed in early 1920s, a time when a trolley ride took travelers from Cobb's Corner to the intersection of East Foxboro and Garden streets! Many visitors from the Boston area came to Sharon via trolley from Mattapan to Cobb's Corner and then transferred to this trolley shown on South Main St. These travelers may have been going to Burkhardt's Grove (area of Harding, Lake & Grove streets) for picnics and/or dancing. Others may have taken the launch from the cove on Beach Street that went across the lake toward the rotary and then along the waters edge following Massapoag Ave., stopping to let passengers off at the various inns or hotels along the way. The final stop was at Boyce's Massapoag Lake Hotel. In looking at the photo Sharon's Quaker Inn is seen on the right (now site of the Eastern Bank) and on the left is a corner of Pettee's Store and the First Baptist Church of Sharon which cannot be seen! As you drive along South Main St., with the traffic of today keep in mind this picture! Remember, your comments are always appreciated. ... See MoreSee Less
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Do you know the month of March is known as Women's History Month? Of course many of you know of one woman who fought in the Revolutionary War disguised as a man! In this picture taken many years ago, it shows former Governor Michael Dukakis signing a proclamation at the Massachusetts State House giving Deborah Sampson (aka Samson) Gannett the honor of becoming Massachusetts State Heroine. Shown here are several individuals who were instrumental in seeking this award for Deborah. She came to live with an aunt & uncle in Sharon following her discharge from the Army. Deborah is buried at Rock Ridge Cemetery where people from all over the country have come ... the most visited grave in the cemetery! Perhaps you may recognize two individuals in this photo .... Peg and Dan Arguimbau, who live in the house on East Street known as the Deborah Sampson House. ... See MoreSee Less
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HELP US SAVE THE PAST FOR THE FUTURE!The Sharon Historical Society, Inc. is looking for the assistance of its members, and residents of Sharon (and all friends of history who wish to contribute) in creating a collection of "PROSE, POETRY & PICTURES FROM THE PANDEMIC." We were surprised at the lack of information regarding the Pandemic of 1918 (known as the "Spanish Flu") and decided that we would like to have something so future generations will have the benefit of our thoughts and experiences. This collection will be displayed eventually at the Sharon Historical Society's museum at 16 High Street and will be an important addition to our history. We welcome submissions from all ages.Please mail all your works to: Sharon Historical Society, P.O. Box 175, Sharon, MA 02067-0175. Electronic submission can be emailed to: sharonhistorical@gmail.com.A deadline has yet to be set. Please watch for further information. - - - -Debbie Johnson Debassio, Project Chairperson ... See MoreSee Less
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Just a few years after the organization of our present day Sharon Historical Society in 1981-82, members were very eager to begin a major project. Not just a yard sale to raise money but something that many people had talked about for years. That project was locating the Stoughtonham Furnace that had been built in 1762 at what is now known as Gavin's Pond, situated off what became Furnace St. The pond was once known as Cannon Pond, later becoming known as Gavin's Pond as members of the Gavin Family lived in the large house "on the hill" since at least the mid-1930s. This picture shows the old Clapp Turning Mill that sat on the edge of the dam. As you can see, someone pointed out the location of the furnace on this picture. Much of the work was done on weekends with several Society families and individuals participating. In our museum we have scrapbooks with pictures showing the work-in-progress as individuals were digging. After finding the location, unfortunately the the site of the hole had to be filled in for safety reason. However, the site being an historical site was eventually placed on the National Register of Historic Places. A sign had been placed at the site of the furnace so visitors would be able to read information about the historical Stoughtonham Furnace where once cannon and cannon balls were made to be used during the Revolutionary War. They were brought by oxen to Dorchester Heights. The sign is no longer there; apparently it was vandalized. We hope it may be found someday, somewhere in Sharon! We also hope when our museum at 16 High Street re-opens you will come by to visit and to view the exhibit we have and to look at photos of the "dig" as well. It could be soon! ... See MoreSee Less
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As you can see this is only a portion of the temporary World War II Honor Roll that was dedicated in 1943. It was located on the side grounds of the Unitarian Church in the Square. Do you recognize some familiar names? This Honor Roll did not include names of all those who served in the United States Armed Forces. As the war continued on many more men and women enlisted. The permanent Honor Roll situated on the grounds of the Sharon Town Hall has a complete list of the men and women from Sharon who served our country. In the same location you will also find the World War I memorial. Have you ever stopped to read the names?During the late 1930s and the 1940s the marching band of boys from the Sacred Heart School on East Foxboro Street provided music for Memorial Day and July 4th parades every year. They are seen here keeping cool amongst the trees lining North Main Street near the historical Aaron Fisher House and the former Congregational Church parsonage. ... See MoreSee Less
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We are terribly sorry to report the death of one of our great members, Nelson Rebello. He died suddenly on February 19th in Good Samaritan Hospital, Brockton surrounded by his family. Nelson was a very well-liked teacher and a coach at Sharon High School for many years, as well as an active member of Our Lady of Sorrows Parish, the Sharon Men's Club and Sharon Historical Society. He was the husband of the late Edna (Lavezzo) Rebello. He leaves his daughter, Carol. and her husband, Lee Harper of PA and two grandchildren. Burial will be private due to the COVID restrictions. ... See MoreSee Less
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HAPPY VALENTINE'S DAY to everyone!Sorry to say it is extremely frustrating to get almost to the end of a post and have it suddenly eliminated for some unknown reason other than pausing for a few seconds!!!! Even clicking on "restore" doesn't bring back all the information already printed! What I had previously printed was frozen in place. I should have taken a picture of the post with my cell phone prior to turning off the computer and then on to reboot and start all over! Even clicking "refresh" doesn't help! Might one of you be able to "clue me in?"I had done some researching about the origin of Valentine's Day. It actually began in the third century as a religious day - a liturgical feast! May I suggest you research the information yourselves! Centuries later it became a day to remember loved ones & friends with cards, gifts, candy & jewelry, etc. School children would enjoy dropping their valentines, (some purchased, others handmade) into a beautifully decorated "Valentine Box" made by the teacher. The day would be topped off by enjoying cookies or cupcakes made by our mothers.February 14, 1940 became another memorable day due to what became known as the Valentine Day Blizzard of 1940! The weather forecast was for rain and light flurries in the morning but about 3 p.m., there was snow falling at the rate of 2-3 inches per hour with 60 mph winds. It eventually ended with high drifts close to 16 inches. People were let out of work early; all Boston department stores closed; drivers were stuck in snow. Here in Sharon cars were backed up trying to get up Saw Mill Hill (North Main St., ) and on Norwood Street at Waldheims Curve (at location now of the nursing home). People waited until finally town trucks with sand came by. In those days we did not have the sanding trucks we have today. Men and sometimes high school boys would stand in the back of the truck dispersing the sand via the shovelful! Sidewalks were cleared of snow via a horse pulling a v-shaped wooden platform with a DPW person walking behind, holding onto the reins of the horse! Both horse and man certainly got their exercise on snowy days! We'd love to have you share your memories of both Valentine's Day and the 1940 Blizzard! ... See MoreSee Less
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Looking out our windows today kind of reminds us of the Blizzard of '78! Was it really 43 years ago? With the amount of snow expected and falling on top of our previous storm the total height of snow will be several inches but maybe not as much as Blizzard of 1978. Some of these pictures have been seen in previous years but some of you have never seen them before. Enjoy looking, reminiscing, sharing your comments. Some may remember being stuck on the highways or even in their own houses. Snow piled up against doors. I know of one family that fortunately had a couple shovels in their basement which their sons took as they climbed out a window onto a porch in order to shovel snow away from the front door. They then shoveled a pathway to driveway and on to the street! Neighbors were helping neighbors; people were out walking, some to and from Cobb's Corner. Sharon's Senior Citizen Bus, driven by Jack Cosgrove, shuttled back and forth from the Square to Cobb's Corner. Star Market was then at Cobb's Corner and Crescent Ridge Dairy Bar was open. People were grateful they were able to purchase eggs, orange juice, bread and a few other items beside ice cream. We will enjoy hearing from you! ... See MoreSee Less
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It is with great sadness and heartfelt sympathy that I tell you the Town of Sharon (and the Sharon Historical Society) has lost another beloved individual. Mort Kaufman, well known to many of you as a teacher, principal and friend, passed away February 3, 2021 at the age of 92. The following information is from his obituary posted by Stanetsky Memorial Chapel in Canton. "Morton was born in Fall River in 1928, he was the son of the late Simon and rose (Cohen) Kaufman. The family moved to Nantucket Island when he was 2 years old. His family ran Cy 's Green Coffee Pot, a well-known establishment on Nantucket for many years. He graduated from Nantucket High School in 1946 and graduated with a degree in History from the University of Vermont and a Masters in Education from Boston University. He served in the U.S. Marine Corps stateside from 1950-1952, reaching the rank of sergeant. He was a teacher and then elementary school principal in Sharon for over 30 years. He believed in the nobility of teaching and education and was renowned for learning the names of all of students in the school after only a few months. An avid and outstanding baseball player in his youth, he loved swimming in the ocean, tennis and all things sports. But he also loved reading, theatre, music. He read the 'New York Times' and the 'Boston Glove' daily for over fifty years. He is predeceased by his beloved wife and friend of over 60 years, Dorothy, and leaves his children, Robert and Julie, and four granddaughters. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Sharon Public Library or the charity of your choice. The family is hoping to have a celebration of his life when the weather is warm and the world is on the mend." ... See MoreSee Less
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Just two weeks ago a new law was passed and signed by legislators in Washington D.C. It was given the name of someone very familiar to us in Massachusetts and, in particular, those of us who live in Sharon! On January 5, 2021, the Deborah Sampson Act was passed "to improve access to the Department of Veterans' Affairs for females, braking the cultural barriers that impact women veterans." As most of you know Deborah is Massachusetts' State Heroine. She had fought in the Revoluntionary War disguised as a male. Following her discharge she came to live in Sharon with an Aunt & Uncle on Bay Road. She later married farmer Benjamin Gannett, raised a family and remained here until her death. She is buried in Rock Ridge Cemetery. Visitors from various states have come to or contacted the Sharon Historical Society for information about Deborah. The picture of Deborah is the only known picture of the true Deborah. It was drawn by a Framingham (MA) artist in 1797 by the name of Joseph Stone. It was used on the cover of a book about Deborah which may be viewed in the Sharon Historical Society's Yellow Schoolhouse Museum. ... See MoreSee Less
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Tomorrow is going to be an exciting day for one of our members! Many of you will remember her from your days at Sharon High School! MARTHA RICH, a former nurse in the Sharon Schools will be celebrating her 98th BIRTHDAY! Although this is last minute, Martha's family is planning a parade of cars to drive by Martha's house (40 Mountain St.) tomorrow, Saturday, Jan. 16th. If you wish to join in the parade, please meet at the Sharon Middle School on Mountain St., prior to 2 p.m. Martha is the oldest member of the Sharon Historical Society. Until about 4 or 5 years ago she was an active member who frequently volunteered as a docent in the Society's Yellow Schoolhouse Museum as well as helping at the annual Yard Sales and many other Society events. In behalf of the Sharon Historical Society we send Martha our congratulations, love and good wishes for an enjoyable and memorable 98th Birthday! ... See MoreSee Less
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WE'RE SENDING GOOD WISHES TO ALL OUR MEMBERS, VIEWERS AND FOLLOWERS FOR A VERY HAPPY and HEALTHY NEW YEAR! This past year has been challenging in so many ways; hopefully 2021 will be much more normal for everyone, everywhere.I had hoped to have some pictures about past "First Night" celebrations here in Sharon but unfortunately for some reason I'm unable to pull them up to post them. However, many of you must remember back to the late 1990s and into the early years of the new century when it was Sharon's tradition to celebrate "First Night" on New Years Eve! Crowds of people would come out to attend the many venues at sites in the Square and elsewhere throughout the Town. How about sharing your memories of those nights with us? What do you remember? In later years, December 31, 2014 to be exact, our Town did revive the "First Night" celebration as we began the year long celebration of the 250th Anniversary of Sharon's Incorporation. Do you recall how bitter cold that night was? Perhaps next year will be a good time to do it again. ... See MoreSee Less
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The Sharon Historical Society, Inc., sends greetings and good wishes to all its members, viewers and followers no matter where you may be today. Although things are different this year, celebrating Christmas has not been cancelled! Have an enjoyable and memorable day! ... See MoreSee Less
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